Daniel Patterson

Bio

Daniel is a second-year PhD candidate in the political science program. His major field of study is political theory and his minor field is international relations. Daniel’s research focuses on deliberative theory, particularly the ethical implications of language and narrative on democratic discourse and citizenship.

His projects engage themes such as ethics, deliberation, and accountability, and are informed by the foundational works of Aristotle and Socrates, as well as contemporary thinkers such as John Rawls and Hannah Arendt. In 2015 his paper “Metaphor Made Manifest: The Role of the War Narrative in Police Militarization” was accepted for presentation at the annual Western Political Science Association conference. Daniel is currently revising a second paper that offers a new interpretation of Teiresias in Sophocles’ The Antigone, arguing that the seer serves a critical function, both dramatically and politically, as phronimos, an embodiment of deliberative virtue and practical wisdom. Daniel is also beginning a new research project, with and for Professor Mark Button, on the intersections of social psychology, virtue ethics, and the institutional conditions that shape and constrain contemporary democratic citizenship.

PAPERS

“Metaphor Made Manifest: The Role of the War Narrative in Police Militarization” (2015).

“Reconsidering Teiresias: Intervention, Interpretation, and the Role of Deliberation in Sophocles’ Antigone” (in progress)

“Re-Politicizing Virtue: A Response to the Situationist Critique of Virtue Ethics” (in progress)

“Deliberation and Democratic Citizenship: Emerson’s Self-Reliance Properly Understood” (in progress).

Presentations

“Metaphor Made Manifest: The Role of the War Narrative in Police Militarization” (presented at Western Political Science Association conference, 2015).

RESEARCH

  • Language, narrative, and metaphor in political rhetoric and their impact on democratic deliberation
  • Exploration of Greek tragedy and models of deliberation (listening, discourse, interpretation, action)
  • Social psychology, virtue ethics, and democratic citizenship.

SERVICE

Graduate Student Advisory Council, 2014 – 2015